Conclusio Thomas Schürmann en

The Cathedral of Amiens

God's ship is a mountain of stone

The cathedral of Amiens from west - The stone mountain that is a ship.

The cathedral of Amiens from west

The stone mountain that is a ship.
Photo: Thomas Schürmann, Lomo Belair X 6-12 Jetsetter , 2013

The first photos with the new Belair X 6-12 Jetsetter were taken in Amiens, France.

Pavement in front of the cathedral - The picture shows two barrier pylons on the west side of Amiens Cathedral.

Pavement in front of the cathedral

The picture shows two barrier pylons on the west side of Amiens Cathedral.
Photo: Thomas Schürmann, Lomo Belair X 6-12 Jetsetter , 2013

The cathedral of Amiens is impressive in itself. 145 metres long, 112.70 metres high. According to legend, it was built on an artichoke field. The cathedral covers an area of 2200 square metres (23680,6 square foot). Its gigantic volume of 200,000 cubic meters covers twice the size of the cathedral Notre Dame de Paris.

The largest part of the cathedral consists of about 90 million years old white chalk, which mainly comes from the Picquigny quarries 10 km downstream from Amiens. It is a very typical rock in the north and west of Picardy, Haute-Normandie and a large part of Nord-Pas-de-Calais. In Picquigny, the 100-year war of 1337 to 1453, so called by historians, was ended by Louis XI, King of France, and Eduard IV, King of England, with the peace treaty of Picquigny.

The Hundred Years' War

The Hundred Years' War contributed decisively to the final development of a national consciousness among both the French and the English, as well as to the final division of France and England into two separate states. In addition, many technical innovations in warfare were introduced, such as heavy artillery at the Battle of Castillon (1453), which was the first European field battle to be decided with gunpowder.

Source: Wikipedia

Everything is connected by invisible ribbons that can be made visible. In this way, a complex stone building takes on another dimension behind it.

The Buttress - The picture shows an excerpt of the first photo, the buttress of the cathedral of Amiens

The Buttress

The picture shows an excerpt of the first photo, the buttress of the cathedral of Amiens
Photo: Thomas Schürmann, Lomo Belair X 6-12 Jetsetter , 2013

The images shown on this page were taken from negatives scanned with a Nikon LS 9000, which also has a 6 x 12 drawer. While I digitized most of the other SW negatives with my two DP Merrils, you notice the difference in quality. The result are images with file sizes of 300 Megabyte with a differentiated and even grain.

Entrance of the cathedral of Amiens - The two wing gates of the cathedral of Amiens

Entrance of the cathedral of Amiens

The two wing gates of the cathedral of Amiens
Photo: Thomas Schürmann, Lomo Belair X 6-12 Jetsetter , 2013

The picture shows how much the rather weak plastic lenses of the Belair X 6-12 Jetsetter distort optically.

Conclusion

Not even a 6 x 12 cm film can reproduce the enormous dimensions of the nave and this mountain of stone.

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